Emergency Medicine

Emergency Medicine

September 18, 2020

As with many things this year, the COVID-19 pandemic required a new venue for the annual ApolloMD Leadership Conference. Traditionally hosted as an in-person two-day retreat, our teams went virtual for this year’s conference. More than 200 clinical and corporate leaders from across the organization gathered online and enjoyed the same great content, guest speakers and networking opportunities.

...CONTINUE READING
July 1, 2020

ApolloMD is honored to announce the recipient of the third annual ApolloMD Emergency Medicine Scholarship, Bassam Zahid, MD.

...CONTINUE READING
May 21, 2020

Juan Class, MSN, ACNP-BC | From the middle of the emergency department, I can hear sirens ringing faintly in the distance. Second-by-second, the ringing grows louder. As I step away from my workstation and look out of the back doors, I see lights flash in the distance. At that moment, I know those lights and sirens are heading this way. Within what feels like mere seconds, a Chattanooga Police Officer

...CONTINUE READING
April 2, 2020

Our nation faces an unprecedented situation with the spread of COVID-19 nationwide. We want our patients, clinicians, and hospital partners to know that we stand with them in these uncertain times.

...CONTINUE READING
January 24, 2020

2019 left healthcare at the center of news headlines and policy discussions. Hospital and health systems nationwide enter 2020 with a focus on the age of the consumer, where technology reigns king and healthcare policy changes could drastically transform the industry.

...CONTINUE READING
March 2, 2017

Left Without Being Seen (LWBS) is a healthcare term often used by emergency departments (ED) to designate a patient encounter that ended with the patient leaving the healthcare setting before he/she could be seen by a certified physician. A low LWBS rate is a reflection of how well an ED is achieving its primary objective of being the safety net for its community. Patients lost as LWBS also impact liability as well as hospital revenue.

...CONTINUE READING
February 17, 2017

Congress enacted the Emergency Medical Treatment and Labor Act (EMTALA) in 1986 as part of the Consolidated Omnibus Budget Reconciliation Act (COBRA) of 1985. It was originally designed to prevent hospitals from refusing to see patients based on their inability to pay, and to assure they transferred patients only when appropriate and in a safe manner.

...CONTINUE READING
LOAD MORE